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Projects by Subject: Civil Rights

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Alabama Memory History Civil Rights Mapping

The Alabama Memory project offers insight into the often supressed history of lynchings in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. In his HY 000 class, Dr. John Giggie led a group of students through their research into the lynchings of 11 African-Americans in 8 different areas of Tuscaloosa County. This research was compiled into an interactive map that includes the location of each lynching, a summary of the events, and primary source documents relevant to the case. The class also analyzed the language used in articles reporting the lynchings by creating word clouds. These word clouds allowed the class to visualize the most commonly used words and phrases for describing the black men and their alleged white female victims.

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“To See Justice Done”: Letters from the Scottsboro Boys Trials Civil Rights

More than eighty years ago, on March 25, 1931, nine young African Americans hopped a train in a Chattanooga freight yard and headed west to seek work. Instead, they found themselves joined together at the center of a life and death courtroom drama, falsely accused of rape. The Scottsboro Boys’ cases focused an international spotlight on Jim Crow in America in the 1930s. In 2013, Alabama legislators passed two bills, acknowledging that the men were “victims of a gross injustice.” One, a resolution, exonerated the nine defendants; and the other created a law making it possible to grant posthumous pardons to the Scottsboro defendants. Part of the Scottsboro Boys Museum University-Community partnership, this digital project aims to create a curated online repository of letters about the Scottsboro Boys Trials sent to Alabama governors during the 1930s from a wide range of correspondents to shed new light on these pivotal historical events.

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Scenes from the Lincoln Normal School Civil Rights

The ADHC partnered with Dr. Christa Vogelius, CLIR Post-Doctoral Fellow for the A. S. Williams III Americana Collection to digitize two rare photograph albums documenting daily life on campus at the Lincoln Normal School in Marion, AL. The school was established for the education of freed slaves after the Civil War, and we worked together to create a website which uses the digitized albums dating from 1909 to 1924 to document the history of Lincoln Normal School. We were proud to launch the website in April 2014, and hope to add to it using other similar photographic holdings in the Williams Collection in the future.

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Digitizing Civil Rights Civil Rights

Digitizing Civil Rights is an online archive that records testimonials about the Civil Rights Movement in Alabama. The project represents the voices of men and women who were directly or indirectly involved with the Movement. The Alabama Digital Humanities Center has been working with Dr. Maha Marouan and her students to build and map the archive since its conception in Spring 2012.