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Projects by Subject: History

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Alabama Memory History Civil Rights Mapping

The Alabama Memory project offers insight into the often supressed history of lynchings in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. In his HY 000 class, Dr. John Giggie led a group of students through their research into the lynchings of 11 African-Americans in 8 different areas of Tuscaloosa County. This research was compiled into an interactive map that includes the location of each lynching, a summary of the events, and primary source documents relevant to the case. The class also analyzed the language used in articles reporting the lynchings by creating word clouds. These word clouds allowed the class to visualize the most commonly used words and phrases for describing the black men and their alleged white female victims.

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Carte de Visite Project History Mapping

The Southern Cartes de Visite Collection is a recently-digitized group of 3,356 photographs from circa 1850 to 1900 from the A. S. Williams III Americana Collection. The ADHC was part of a larger collaboration within the University Libraries to create a digital map depicting the locations of photographers, studios, and galleries represented within the collection of cartes de visite, creating an interface in which users can browse the collection geographically, or filter it by photographer. Users can also access a link to the Acumen database to see and manipulate the cartes de visite photographs. The cartes-de-visite, or "visiting cards," are part of the A.S. Williams III Americana Collection at The University of Alabama. The photographs represent an impressive range of southern studios during a time when the prints were the most popular and inexpensive form of portrait photography. Small (2 1/2 by 4 1/2) albumen images mounted on cardstock, cartes-de-visite allowed customers to quickly and easily share photographs with friends, family, and colleagues. Many prominent and lesser-known photographers are represented, and the collection serves as a valuable resource for historians of the South, genealogists, and the general public.

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William Bradford Huie at 100 History

The William Bradford Huie@100 project, inspired by the recent gift of Huie materials to the W.S. Hoole Special Collections Library at The University of Alabama from his widow Martha Huie, is a celebration of Huie’s life and work.   WBH@100 is a multi-faceted and interdisciplinary look at the history and culture of much of the 20th century through the eyes of one brilliant writer. William Bradford Huie graduated from The University of Alabama in 1930, and from his days as a student, through his long and varied career as an author and journalist, he was able to find a great story and bring forth the truth. This website will serve as a permanent gathering place for ideas, scholarship, and information on Huie and his legacy.

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Knitting History History Timeline

Knitting History is the result of a collabortive effort of the students in Professor Kopelson's history class titled Handmade Nation: Knitting and History. Students compiled a timeline of significant moments in the history of knitting, as well as moments in which knitting impacted history. Additionally, students put their own knitting skills to the test, creating an exhibit of their own projects tied to history.

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Ancient Pasts History

This project is a compilation of work done by students in CL 385, "History of Greece", and CL 386, "History of Rome". The Ancient Pasts website serves as a library of essays produced by students on Herodotus, Thucydides, Livy, and Tacitus.

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Historical Archives and Storytelling English History

UA Genealogies: Historical Archives and Storytelling is a digital archive of the extraordinary family histories discovered by students in Lauren S. Cardon’s EN103 Advanced Composition course. Using a variety of digital and archival resources including the W. S. Hoole and A. S. Williams III Special Collections, students explored their genealogies, creating written narratives documenting particularly significant people or moments in their family histories. UA Genealogies showcases students’ findings about their heritage: in the Narratives section users can browse full-length stories, whilst the Map section displays these stories geographically to give a sense of the global origins of our community at the University of Alabama. Over time, this project will be added to by students participating in future iterations of this course to build a rich narrative documenting the history of the UA student community.

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Early American History Project History

Heather Miyano Kopelson is creating a pedagogical project with her students in repeated iterations of HY107 American Civilization to 1877, exploring America’s history before permanent European settlement. The website houses student video projects on a particular facet of early American history, in addition to a student-generated webliography on different important topics in this field for use by other students and scholars in this field. Students have also taken a creative approach by designing their own historical monuments commemorating moments in this period of history which they determine to be of particular historical significance, and these are also displayed within this digital resource, and will continue to be augmented by students in future semesters.

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Native American Digital History Project History Community

This project houses work done by students in Heather Miyano Kopelson’s HY300 course, examining the histories of hundreds of indigenous peoples in North America from early human habitation to the present day, with a focus on those residing in what is now the United States and Canada. Students are exploring Native American history in numerous different ways, all of which are displayed in this website, including analysis of primary source materials from archives to give a first-hand understanding of this complex and wide-ranging subject from many different angles, to the creation of an interactive map of significant historical locations in Native American history such as nearby Moundville, AL. Students are also contributing entries to a detailed timeline of important events in Native American history. This website will be added to by student in multiple future iterations of this course, to foster a learning community of participants in HY300 over time, and to create a valuable public resource about Native American history.

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Hobo News Digital Archive History

This project is a collaboration between the ADHC and the St. Louis Public Library which aims to digitize the extremely rare newspaper publication Hobo News from the early twentieth century, and ultimately to make this digital collection available to the public. The Hobo News was created by and for hobos, including a gregarious variety of materials from reports from workers’ societies and conventions to creative re-writings of hymns and popular tunes aiming to propagate socialist ideals, as well as adverts placed by families seeking lost or missing relatives who they hoped might be known among the travelling community. There is only one known complete run of the Hobo News extant to us today, housed in the Special Collections of the St. Louis Public Library, and they are graciously partnering with us to create a proof-of-concept site which we hope will later grow and be available publicly. Ultimately, we aim to incorporate not only scans of the publication on the site, and to make these fully searchable via OCR and detailed metadata, but also to create visualizations showing the geographic range and spread of the publication and its contributors which will highlight its very specific relationship with St. Louis and other key hubs in the early twentieth century.

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Mapping Hotspots in the Early Modern Social Network History

The development of logic in the early modern period was propelled by a comprehensive network of scholars working throughout Europe and the Americas, spanning the confessional and polemical spectrum. This project is a precursor of the large-scale EMNON project hosted at the ADHC, and used network diagramming software to chart relationships between specific subsets of the vast scholarly network of logicians and writers working between 1500 and 1750. NodeXL was employed to visualize connections between Puritan and Presbyterian logicians which enabled the transmission of a very specific brand of logic from France to the Netherlands, England, and ultimately North America where it formed the basis of the syllabus in this subject at Harvard and Yale in the seventeenth- and eighteenth-centuries. This research was presented in a paper at the Sixteenth-Century Society Conference in October 2014.